Exhibitions

Towards a Foreign Land

Special Exhibition
February 22 to May 5, 2024

Guest curator Milovan Mracevich explores the lives of Yugoslav citizens who came to Canada in the 1920s. Some stayed, while many returned. Hands-on presentation of archival photographs and documents show the hopes, dramas and determination of people navigating immigration in challenging times.

Exhibition details →

Exhibition information alongside a photograph of a young man.

#HopeAndHealingCanada

Special Exhibition
December 2023 to December 2025

Métis artist Tracey-Mae Chambers has installed an intervention in red wool, silk and cotton yarn in the Canadian Immigration Story exhibition. “Since July 2021, I have created over 100 installations at residential school historical sites, museums, art galleries and other public spaces. Many of these spaces present a colonial viewpoint and primarily speak about the settlers who arrived and lived here, but not the Indigenous people that were displaced.”

Exhibition details →

Tracey-Mae standing in front of one of her art pieces.

Crossing Lines: A New Age of Migration

Special Exhibition
January 10 to March 24, 2024

Photographers Darren Ell and Roger LeMoyne weave together images of recent migrations on three continents with portraits of refugees now in Canada. Their personal stories offer a counterpoint to the documentation of the dramatic events driving global migration.

Exhibition details →

Exhibition information alongside a photograph of people climbing ashore and a portrait of a woman.

The Canadian Immigration Story

Permanent Exhibition

Witness the challenge and triumph, the joy and injustice experienced by newcomers to Canada in the past and in the present. And learn about the vast contributions immigrants have made to Canada.

Exhibition details →

A long colourful bench with sections divided by centuries and events.

The Pier 21 Story

Permanent Exhibition

Step into the past and experience what it was like to immigrate to Canada through Pier 21. From the ship you sailed on, to customs and immigration in Halifax, to the train you took to your final destination, discover the past housed in the walls of our National Historic Site.

Exhibition details →

A long view of the Pier 21 Story exhibition space including a train car.

The Wheel of Conscience

Special Exhibition

The Wheel of Conscience sheds light on a dark moment in Canadian history. This memorial sculpture, designed by architect Daniel Libeskind, is a potent reminder of the dangers of racism, xenophobia, and anti-Semitism.

Exhibition details →

Sculpture is a heavy steel wheel with four interlocking steer gears.