Search the Collections

Our online collection contains 1347 stories, 5003 images and 637 oral histories.

Title Date of Arrival Culture Related Ship Accession Number Language More Information
Photograph portrait of Ella and Gordon Comrie, c. 1945 c. 1945 DI2016.476.2

Donated to the Museum by Ella Comrie, July 1 2006
In September 1943, Ella Comrie, and her sister, Cathie, took vising friends out dancing at the Lacarno in Glasgow, Scotland. There Ella met her future husband, Gordon (Joe) Comrie, a member of the Queen’s Own Rifles, based out of Toronto, Ontario. They corresponded for the next three years and would meet every three months when Gordon was on leave. Gordon returned to Scotland in July 1945 after the European campaign. Ella and Gordon were married on July 18 1945 and a month later Gordon returned to Canada. Ella departed from Southampton and arrived at Pier 21 on June 27 1946 on board RMS Aquitania. It took two days for her to be processed and allowed off the ship. She took the train to Toronto and was met by Gordon, his family, and his best friend. They settled in Toronto and had their first daughter in 1947 and their second in 1951.
During the First and Second World Wars civilian, European women, married Canadian soldiers. Most of the women came from Great Britain, with fewer numbers coming from other European countries. These women are referred to as War brides.

Photograph portrait of Elizabeth Wasnidge, c. 1944 (No Restriction) c. 1944 DI2016.265.4 English

Donated to the Museum by Elizabeth Wasnidge, Unknown date
Elizabeth (Lily) Wasnidge (née Adams) was born in Lancaster, England and met her husband, Canadian soldier, Carl Wasnidge, at a dance during the Second World War. They were engaged in December 1943 and married in April 1944. Carl returned to Canada and Elizabeth and their daughter followed from Southampton in 1946 on board RMS Aquitania. They arrived at Pier 21 and took the train to London and Parkhill, Ontario. They had three more daughters in 1947, 1949, and 1955.

Photograph portrait of Biase Di Pasquale, circa 1954 (No Restriction) c. 1954 DI2015.301.1

Donated to Pier 21, May 19 2010, by Biase and Graziella Di Pasquale.
Biase Di Pasquale immigrated to Canada from Italy on board SS Conte Biancamano on November 18, 1953. Graziella Di Pasquale (née Di Giovanni) immigrated to Canada from Italy on board MS Vulcania in April 1954. Biase and Graziella met while working at Marra's Bread in Amherstburg, Ontario. They were married in April 1956 and had two daughters, Antoinette and Maria Lisena.

Photograph portrait of Barbara Boldt, 2000 (No Restriction) 2000 DI2016.390.6

Donated to the Museum by Barbara Boldt, February 27 2014
Barbara Boldt (née Bärbel/Baerbel Hartmann) was born in 1930 in Mülheim-Ruhr, Germany. In 1951 when a man in Sherbrooke, Quebec was looking to employ a German domestic/housemaid. Barbara accepted and her father and two brothers were promised jobs at the Ingersoll Rand Company. Barbara and her brothers, Erich and Ulrich, arrived at Pier 21 on April 7 1952 and disembarked on April 8 1952. Barbara's parents and younger sister, Erika, joined them six months later.

Photograph portrait of Anthony Crutcher, 1976 1976 DI2014.613.11

Donated to the Museum by Betty Crutcher, June 21 2006
Beatrice (Betty) Maud Crutcher (née England) was born in Portchester, Hampshire, England in 1922. She joined the Women’s Royal Naval Service during the Second World War. She met Canadian Army Lieutenant, James (Jim) Crutcher, and they married on July 25 1945. Jim returned to Canada in March or April 1946. Betty departed from Southampton and arrived at Pier 21 on June 2 1946 on board HMHS Lady Nelson. They settled in Orillia, Ontario. Betty returned to England for a visit in 1948 on board RMS Queen Mary for six months. She sailed back to Canada on board RMS Queen Elizabeth. Jim and Betty had two sons, Rodney and Anthony.

Photograph portrait of Anne Forster Jones, 1944 1944 DI2016.152.1 English

Donated to Pier 21, by Barbara Jackson, July 8 2009
During the First and Second World Wars civilian, European women, married Canadian soldiers. Most of the women came from Great Britain, with fewer numbers coming from other European countries. These women are referred to as War Brides.

Photograph of Zoltan Tayti while in the Canadian Army, circa 1943-1944 (No Restriction) c. 1920 to 1930 DI2013.1501.3

Donated to Pier 21, May 2 2005, by Elizabeth M. Tayti.
Elizabeth Tayti's husband, Zoltan, immigrated to Canada from Hungary with his mother, Anna Katona, and brother, Pal, on board SS Montcalm, arriving in Quebec City on October 24, 1930. The family then travelled by train to join Zoltan's father, Istvan, who had sailed from Antwerp on board SS Minnedosa and arrived in Quebec City on August 21, 1925. The family settled in Welland, Ontario where a daughter, Anna, was born. Zoltan served in the Second World War and legally changed the spelling of his last name from Tatji to Tayti. After the war, Zoltan worked for General Motors, retiring in 1981. He was married twice and had two sons and three step-children. Zoltan had many hobbies: he belonged to the Independent Mutual Benefit Federation orchestra, was a black belt in Judo and taught Judo and ballroom dancing, among others. All three siblings - Zoltan, Pal and Anna - passed away within 11 months of each other.

Photograph of Zoltan and Pal Tatji with their mother, Anna Katona, and Grandmother, circa 1927-1928 (No Restriction) c. 1920 to 1930 DI2013.1501.1

Donated to Pier 21, May 2 2005, by Elizabeth M. Tayti.
Elizabeth Tayti's husband, Zoltan, immigrated to Canada from Hungary with his mother, Anna Katona, and brother, Pal, on board SS Montcalm, arriving in Quebec City on October 24, 1930. The family then travelled by train to join Zoltan's father, Istvan, who had sailed from Antwerp on board SS Minnedosa and arrived in Quebec City on August 21, 1925. The family settled in Welland, Ontario where a daughter, Anna, was born. Zoltan served in the Second World War and legally changed the spelling of his last name from Tatji to Tayti. After the war, Zoltan worked for General Motors, retiring in 1981. He was married twice and had two sons and three step-children. Zoltan had many hobbies: he belonged to the Independent Mutual Benefit Federation orchestra, was a black belt in Judo and taught Judo and ballroom dancing, among others. All three siblings - Zoltan, Pal and Anna - passed away within 11 months of each other.

Photograph of Zoltan and Pal Tatji with their Aunt Katalin Tatji and mother, Anna Katona Tatji, 1930 (No Restriction) 1930 DI2013.1501.5

Donated to Pier 21, May 2 2005, by Elizabeth M. Tayti.
Elizabeth Tayti's husband, Zoltan, immigrated to Canada from Hungary with his mother, Anna Katona, and brother, Pal, on board SS Montcalm, arriving in Quebec City on October 24, 1930. The family then travelled by train to join Zoltan's father, Istvan, who had sailed from Antwerp on board SS Minnedosa and arrived in Quebec City on August 21, 1925. The family settled in Welland, Ontario where a daughter, Anna, was born. Zoltan served in the Second World War and legally changed the spelling of his last name from Tatji to Tayti. After the war, Zoltan worked for General Motors, retiring in 1981. He was married twice and had two sons and three step-children. Zoltan had many hobbies: he belonged to the Independent Mutual Benefit Federation orchestra, was a black belt in Judo and taught Judo and ballroom dancing, among others. All three siblings - Zoltan, Pal and Anna - passed away within 11 months of each other.

Pages