Search the Collections

Our online collection contains 1347 stories, 5003 images and 637 oral histories.

Title Date of Arrival Culture Related Ship Accession Number Language More Information
Photographs of Ocean Falls, British Columbia, 1950-1952 1950s DI2013.855.19 English

Donated to the Museum by Maria Vogel.
Maria and her husband, Frithjof, came to Canada from Germany in the 1950s.

Photographs of MS Italia, January 1953 (No Restriction) January 1953 DI2014.576.2

Donated to Pier 21, September 26 2009, by Rosemarie Angelow.
Rosemarie Angelow (née Lumma) was born in Germany in 1929. She arrived in Halifax in January 1953 on board MS Italia.

Photographs of Margaret Eaton with family, 1940-1945 1940 to 1945 DI2016.509.1 English

Donated to the Museum by Marjorie Eaton, December 12 2012
Margaret Eaton (previously Bristow, née Perkins) was born in the Midlands of England on in 1919. She met her husband, Bill Bristow, while he was stationed in her hometown with the Royal Canadian Regiment in May 1940. They were married on November 5 1940. He was stationed in various places in England and she moved to where he was located. She had their daughter, Anne, in 1942 and their son, John in 1943. Bill later went to France and was taken prisoner by the Germans at Caen. She received a telegram saying he was missing and killed. Several months later she was informed that he was alive. Margaret and her two children departed from Liverpool on March 29 1945 on board HMT Franconia. They arrived at Pier 21 on April 11 1945 and took the train to Chatham, Ontario where they were met by Bill's parents and sister. Bill returned home on August 9 1945 on board HMT Ile de France. Bill passed away in 1956 and Margaret later remarried.
During the First and Second World Wars civilian, European women, married Canadian soldiers. Most of the women came from Great Britain, with fewer numbers coming from other European countries. These women are referred to as War brides.

Photographs of June and Jack King, 1942-2006 c. 2006 DI2016.473.2

Donated to the Museum by Susan Gibbons, July 14 2006
Susan Gibbons is the daughter of June Daisy and Jack King.
June Daisy King (née Watkins) was born in Southeast Dulwich, London, England, in 1923. She met her husband, Jack King, from Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, while he was stationed in London in July 1940. Jack was playing drums in the West Nova Scotia Regiment army band at a dance. They were married in London on December 13 1942. Jack went to Scotland for training in May 1943 and left to invade Sicily in July. He returned home to Canada in March 1945. June arrived at Pier 21 on April 5 1945. They lived in Halifax for two years, both working at Simpson’s. In 1947, they returned to England where they had their first daughter, Jan. In 1951, they moved to Kitchener, Ontario and had their second daughter, Susan, in 1952.
During the First and Second World Wars civilian, European women, married Canadian soldiers. Most of the women came from Great Britain, with fewer numbers coming from other European countries. These women are referred to as War brides.

Photographs of Fryke and Hendrik Oostenbrug by the sea, circa 1948 (No Restriction) c. 1948 DI2014.134.13

Donated to Pier 21, July 28 2009, by Fryke Oostenbrug.
Fryke Oostenbrug and her husband immigrated to Canada from The Netherlands on board SS Kota Inten, arriving at Pier 21 in March 1948. The Oostenbrugs sought a more prosperous and stable environment than the war-ravaged Netherlands. They settled in Nova Scotia for a time, initially finding employment on the farm of the Honourable A.W. MacKenzie, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry, before moving to Ontario.

Photographs of Daniël Braeckevelt, circa 1960s-1990s (No Restriction) 1990s DI2013.710.5 English

Donated to Pier 21, October 20 2008, by Daniël Braeckevelt.
Daniël Braeckevelt immigrated to Canada in 1966, settling in St. Boniface, Manitoba after a short time in Ontario. It was there that he met Maurice Leon Claeys, who had immigrated to Canada from Belgium some decades before and who provided him with some assistance settling in to Canada. In the early 1970s, Maurice gave Daniël a brief handwritten memoir of his life; Daniël eventually provided this to the Museum, along with his own postscript and a short photo album. Maurice Claeys immigrated to Canada from Belgium on board SS Pennland Cunard, arriving at Pier 21 in May 1927. Maurice worked on the railways and did odd jobs during the Great Depression, eventually settling in St. Boniface.

Photographs of Astrid being prepared for sailing, early 1948 (No Restriction) 1948 DI2014.230.1

Donated to Pier 21, May 21 2005, by Eugen Oder.
Eugen Oder fled Estonia for Sweden after the Second World War and chose to leave the continent because of Soviet threats. After purchasing the schooner Astrid, he sailed to Canada with 28 others. They arrived in August 1948 after a six week journey. Eugen settled in Montreal, Quebec. He passed away on November 22, 2012.

Photographs and Marriage Record for Apolonia and Willem Smit, June 13 1936 (No Restriction) June 13 1936 DI2006.4.75

Donated to Pier 21, July 5 2004, by Ed Smith.
Ed Smith was born Adriaan Smit in 's-Heer Arendskerke, Netherlands on August 4, 1945. After the Second World War, he immigrated to Canada with his parents, Willem and Apolonia, and his brothers, Nicolaas and Marrinus. They travelled on board SS Waterman, sailing from Rotterdam on June 24, 1952 and arriving in Halifax on July 2, 1952. The family made their way west, initially bound for Winnipeg, Manitoba but eventually settling in the Regina area in Saskatchewan. The family changed their surname from Smit to Smith.

Photograph taken on board TSS Maasdam, May 4 1957 May 4 1957 DI2015.115.5

Donated to the Museum by Gerhard Flohr, June 10 2007
Gerhard Flohr was born in Hiedleberg, Germany in 1932. He departed from Rotterdam, the Netherlands on April 26 1957 and arrived at Pier 21 on May 4 1957 on board TSS Maasdam. He then took the train to Montreal, Quebec where a job was waiting for him. 

Pages